Agenda

NATIVE PHILANTHROPY INSTITUTE

25th Anniversary Celebration & Annual Gathering

Pre-conference Events

 

Saturday, May 2, 2015

 

Powwow for HopePFH_LifeLoveHope-03  Attend American Indian Cancer Foundation’s (AICAF) 4th Annual Powwow for Hope™ “Dancing for Life, Love, & Hope”.  Powwow for Hope™ “Dancing for Life, Love, & Hope” is an annual fundraiser that honors loved ones who have battled cancer or are fighting cancer and provides an opportunity to learn more about cancer prevention and resources. All funds raised by individuals and teams directly support the Foundation’s work to address the cancer burdens faced by many American Indian families throughout Indian Country. Learn about Powwow for Hope at their website or donate to the cause here.

Location: Base Camp Facility 201 Bloomington Rd., Minneapolis, MN 55111

Sunday, May 3, 2015

12:00pm – 4:30pm Registration (Registration/Coat Check)

12:00pm – 1:00pm  Lunch  (registration required; included in the NPI registration price)  

1:00pm – 4:00pm  Choose one of two:

Art of Reciprocity (AoR)-a condensed three-hour version of our three-day fund development workshop, the AoR program is primarily for nonprofits and tribal programs who are in the trenches of creating change. The mini-workshop is an interactive session  to approach to fund development that reflects Native values, culture and history of giving grounded.  (Registration required; included in the NPI registration price).  

For more information about the full of Art of Reciprocity program, click here.

Native Culture Context for Philanthropy (NCCP)-a condensed three hour version of our four day symposium that is a primer and safe space for philanthropic, foundations and other institutions interested in learning more about Indian Country and how to engage. (Registration required; included in the NPI registration price)

For more information about the full Native Culture Context for Philanthropy program, click here.

Monday, May 4 2015

 7:30am – 4:00pm    Registration
                                  Registration/Coat Check

 7:30am –  9:00pm    Networking Breakfast
                                   Grand Ballroom

        9:00am – 11:00am   Cultural Engagement: LaDonna Harris, Indian 101
                                          Shakopee

  • LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 is a documentary produce for PBS by Julianna Brannum (Comanche) that premiered in November. LaDonna Harris, President of Americans for Indian Opportunity, is a remarkable statesnian and national leader who has enriched the lives of thousands. She helped convince the Nixon administration to return sacred ground to the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico, in 1970 founded the Americans for Indian opportunity and became a vice-presidential nominee in 1980. LaDonna has devoted her life to building coalitions that create change. She has been a consistent and ardent advocate on behalf of Tribal America. In addition, she continues her activism in the areas of civil rights, environmental protection, the women’s movement and world peace. Presenters: Shirley Sneve and Georgia Lee, Vision Maker Media

11:00am – 11:30am   Blessing by Leonard Wabasha, Spiritual Leader
                                    Grand Ballroom

11:30am – 12:30pm  Lunch
                                   Grand Ballroom

12:30pm – 1:45pm    Opening & Keynote: Dr. Kathleen Annette, President/CEO Blandin Foundation and Brian Cladoosby, President National Congress of American Indians
                                   Grand Ballroom

  1:45pm – 3:15pm – Breakout Sessions

  • NAP Clinics
    Mahkato

    • Finance: Daniel Lemm, CFE, Accountant, McKnight Foundation
    • Grantwriting/Proposal: Edgar Villanueva, Program Officer, Marguerite Casey Foundation
    • Board Governance: Patricia St. Onge, Seventh Generation Consulting
  • Giving Circles – An old tradition with a new twist:
    Little Crow I
    Giving is an honored tradition of many cultures, but American philanthropy often lifts up giving that only includes millionaires and celebrities. Giving Circles offer a more grounded and collective approach to giving that appeals to cultural communities. In this session, you’ll hear about different giving models, how the giving and fundraising process are community-driven and how nonprofits are can tap into giving circles as new funding source. Presenters: Susan Balbas, Na’ah Illahee Fund; Bo-Thao Urabe, Asian American Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy
  • The Funding Change Playbook – 10 Conversations for Every Foundation & Nonprofit:
    Little Crow II
    Alliance for Justice will share results of decades of work with foundations and nonprofits: 10 best practices of foundations that build trust, gain wisdom, and improve communications with nonprofit partners. Next, we’ll compare The Funding Change Playbook’s 10 best practices to the findings from NAP’s recent publication, Native Voices Rising. Plus, we’ll share some foundation stories about how these practices look in real life. Lastly, the audience gets to map the opportunities and barriers for some of the best practices and learn how to have conversations about each one when they get home. Presenters: Christine Reeves, Alliance for Justice; Carly Hare, Joint Affinity Groups; Edgar Villanueva, Marguerite Casey Foundation
  • Making the Invisible Visible – Urban Indian America:
    Wabasha I
    It a common myth that Native Americans primarily live on reservations which has lead to misconceptions in funding needs in urban and rural communities. In this session, presenters will share a snapshot of the nonprofit sector currently serving the needs of off-reservation American Indian populations as well as the findings of a three-year roundtable project entitled “Making the Invisible Visible: Urban Indian America.” Presenters: Jeneen Comote, National Urban Indian Family Coalition; Matthew Morton, NAYA Family Center
  • Creating a Collaborative Vision to Advance the Health of Native Communities:
    Wabasha II
    In March, 2015, a tribal leaders’ summit was convened to develop a public health agenda to promote health in Native communities. This was the culmination of a four-year process to assess the feasibility of creating a Tribal Public Health Institute (TPHI) and the possible role of a TPHI in efforts to increase health and wellness across Native American and Alaskan Native communities. Presenters will discuss this process and how public health professionals, community members and funders worked together to make the project a success. Presenters: Don K. Warne, MD, MPH, Master of Public Health Program, North Dakota State University; Kristine Rhodes, MPH, American Indian Cancer Foundation; Keisha Robinson, MPH, Red Star Innovations; Katie Wehr, MPH, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

  3:15pm – 3:30pm   Break

  3:30pm – 5:00pm – Breakout Sessions

  • NAP Clinics
    Mahkato

    • Grantwriting/Proposal: Melissa Powless Chacon, Development Consultant & VISTA Supervisor Inter Tribal Sports, Inc. and Anna Ross, formerly with Bii Gii Wiin Community Development Loan Fund
    • Board Governance: Patricia St. Onge, Seventh Generation Consulting
  • Ensuring Indian Inclusion and Participation in Mainstream Philanthropy:
    Little Crow I
    Mainstream philanthropy has consistently underfunded Indian Country and Native nonprofits. There are many reasons for this. Native organizations need to overcome this disparity and assure Indian Country’s inclusion and participation in mainstream philanthropy. Panel members will discuss their successes and present strategies for building and maintaining relationships with mainstream foundations. Presenters: Marshall McKay, Yocha Dehe Winton Nation, Don Ragona, Native American Rights Fund; Loris Taylor, Native Public Media
  • Let’s be Honest –  Feedback for Creating Philanthropy’s New Normal:
    Little Crow II
    This session will introduce participants to Philanthropy, a program of NCRP that conducts research on foundations’ work and provides community feedback. Participants will learn about trends in the findings and discuss strategies for making high-impact the norm in philanthropy. The presenter will share concrete suggestions from already completed assessments for changes foundations can make in order to increase the impact of their work. Presenter: Aaron Dorfman, National Committee on Responsive Philanthropy
  • Social Impact Investing:
    Wabasha I
    Now, more than ever, there is an increased focus on creating an impact through philanthropic initiatives and giving. With greater emphasis on impact, it is important that leaders, trustees, board members, staff, volunteers and individuals have a complete view of impact as it relates to the organizations they serve and support. While philanthropic impact covers a magnitude of hot topics, one of the most popular is impact investing. By attending this session, attendees will explore how they can align investment portfolios alongside their personal and organizational values, gain a greater understanding of impact investing and how it works, and hear examples of how impact portfolios have successfully been implemented for nonprofit organizations. Presenter: Stephen Burns, CFA, Glenmede Wealth and Investment Management
  • Collaborating to Build Policy Agenda for Native Youth:
    Wabasha II
    This session will use a recent collaboration between the Center for American Progress and the Center for Native American Youth to demonstrate strategies and insights on how native and non-native organizations can collaborate to build Native policy issues into a broader policy change agenda and the role funders can play in this process. Presenter: Erik Stegman

  5:00pm – 5:30pm   Break

  5:30pm – 6:30pm   Reception & Silent Auction
                                 
Grand Ballroom

  6:30pm – 9:00pm   25th Anniversary Celebration & Award Dinner with entertainment by Bluedog Band. Tickets available for this event only. See registration page.
                                  Grand Ballroom

 

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

 

  7:30am –  2:00pm  Registration
                                  Registration/Coat Check

  7:30am –   8:30am  Network Breakfast
                                   Grand Ballroom

  8:30am –   3:00pm  Site Tour:
                                   Little Crow I

  • FULL – Shakopee, MN., Mdewakanton Sioux Community tour – The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) is a federally recognized Indian tribe located southwest of the Twin Cities. Tribal members are direct lineal descendants of Mdewakanton Dakota people who once resided in villages near the banks of the lower Minnesota River. SMSC presently owns more than 3,760 acres of land, all of which are located within or near the original 250-acre reservation.SMSC, the largest employer in Scott County , has also donated more than $290 million to organizations and causes since 1992, funds its own infrastructure, and voluntarily contributes to regional infrastructure such as roads, water and sewer systems, and emergency services. Participants will tour various enterprises established and run by the SMSC in support of a healthy, thriving community. Presenter: Janice Bad Moccasin, Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community.

  8:30am – 10:00am – Breakout Sessions & NAP Clinics

  • NAP Clinics
    Mahkato

    • Finance: John Skelling, Accountant, MAP for Nonprofits
    • Grantwriting Proposal: Monica Bryand, Headwaters for Justice
  • Journey to Successful Fundraising:
    Little Crow I
    The core of fundraising is relationship building and actively engaging people with your organization’s mission. In this training participants will learn about the world of philanthropy and how to convey your story of your organization in a way that funders understand. Presenters: Tachini Pete and Dana Arviso, Potlatch Fund
  • Native Models of Need Assessment:
    Grand Ballroom
    Many people think of evaluation as something done only to meet funder requirements. In this workshop, we will explore how evaluation can support the quality and sustainability of programs.  We will discuss how to decide what to measure, the various types of data that can be used, and effective and culturally appropriate methods for gathering and assessing these data. Participants will leave with a better understanding of how they can incorporate evaluation into their work in a meaningful way. Presenters: Lee Francis IV, PhD, Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers; Robert Sturm, NAP Southwest Regional Action Network Weaver
  • Digital Storytelling – Getting your point across:
    Wabasha I
    In this workshop, we will explore the elements that create a good story, how to define your core message, how to adapt stories to a visual format, how to use technology effectively to capture your story, and how you can use your final product on websites, on social media and in other contexts.  We will illustrate concepts with film clips and will distribute hand-outs that will help you to organize and use the information provided. Presenter: Sonya Oberly, Porcupine Film School
  • Foundations 101 – How can Native and tribal communities interact with foundations/funders?:
    Wabasha II
    The landscape of mainstream philanthropy can be a challenge to understand all its nuances.  We will share with participants the different types of foundations, where to find them, what they are looking for, how to understand and navigate eligibility and the application process, as well as how to cultivate and maintain ongoing relationships.  Attendees will leave the session with a stronger understanding of how funders work and how to positively engage and interact with them for long-term success. Presenters: Erika McDaniel and Melanie Quackenbush, Glenmede Wealth and Investment Management

10:00am – 10:30am  Break

10:30am – 12:00pm  Nonprofit Workshops:

  • Native Models of Program Evaluation:
    Grand Ballroom
    In this workshop, we will discuss how to take the idea for a new program and make it live. Needs assessments allow us to use data of various kinds, including input from community members, to assess unmet needs and explore the best way to respond to them. The results of needs assessments can be used internally to help us put resources and energy into programs that will have meaningful outcomes for our communities, and externally, to support requests for funding and programmatic support. Presenters: Lee Francis IV, PhD, Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers; Robert Sturm, NAP Southwest Regional Action Network Weaver
  • Grantwriting Skills: The Basics:
    Little Crow I
    This session provides an interactive workshop that gives you a 4-directions overview of the entire grant proposal process, with in-depth emphasis on key areas within an easy to understand method.  This hands-on workshop will include practical exercises that will take you step-by-step through the stages of assessing your readiness for grant-writing, learning how to read and decipher an RFP, and identify the core components of a grant proposal. Presenters: Marita Jones, Shelley Frazier and Tina Tso, Healthy Native Communities Partnership
  • Elevate This!:
    Little Crow II
    It’s one of the things that most non-profit leaders and boards struggle with, telling their mission story in less than 30 seconds. This practical interactive workshop gives you practice and insight in how to build the right ask for the right audience. You will walk away at least one natural, fluent and impactful elevator pitch you can immediately use to share the compelling story of your non-profit. Get ready to succinctly articulate the return on investment from your mission driven organization. Tailor your message to enhance it’s effectiveness. Presenters: Marnita Schroedl, Marnita’s Table

       10:30am – 11:30 am

  • 7 Productivity apps nonprofits shouldn’t be without:
    Wabasha I
    We’re always looking for ways to do more with less. In this short session, we’ll share some free (or almost free) apps for your smartphone and laptop that help you get more out of you day.  Whether you’re an avid user of apps already, or downloading one for the first time, consider these options into your everyday routine. Presenter: Y. Elaine Rasmussen, Native Americans in Philanthropy
  • Social Media 101:
    Wabasha II
    Whether you’re enthusiastic or the thought of social media give you hives, there’s no way around the fact that social media can feel like an overwhelming endeavor. This Social Media 101 Series offers basic introduction into social media; what it is, who is on it, how to get started and why it might important for your organization to have a presence on social media. We will review some of the more familiar platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Vine, and LinkedIn. If you’re looking to get started on these platforms or want to revisit the basics, this series is a great resource. Presenter: Candice Mendez, Native Public Media

12:00pm –   1:00pm  Lunch
                                   Wabasha I

  1:00pm –   2:30pm – NAP Clinics & Breakout Sessions

  • NAP Clinics
    Mahkato

    • Evaluation: Robert Sturm & Dr. Lee Francis IV
      Finance: John Skelling, Accountant, MAP for Nonprofits
    • Social Media: Leigh Holmes, Holmes Unlimited
  • Digital Storytelling/Healthy Native Community Partners:
    Little Crow I
    You worked hard to create your digital story… now what?  Learn how to use your story to engage people in conversations that matter.  In this interactive workshop you will practice hands-on activities to design and engage your audience in meaningful learning experiences.  Learn how to use the Circle Conversation: Talking Journey process to lead a group dialogue that allows people to deepen their understanding of issues that affect them and to plan collective actions to address them. Presenters: Marita Jones, Shelley Frazier and Tina Tso, Healthy Native Communities Partnership
  • Board Development and Inclusion in Strategic Planning:
    Wabasha I
    We will examine the role and responsibility of a Non-profit Board of Directors in strategic planning.   Board leadership and participation in strategic planning are essential to creating and sustaining healthy nonprofits, but many Board members and nonprofit staff are unclear about how this process should work.  By the end of this workshop, you will better understand the value of strategic planning, the role of the Board in the this process, and what training and resources Board members may need in order to effectively exercise this responsibility. Presenter: Don Chalmers, SparrowHawk Consulting
  • Building Civic and Political Power in Native communities:
    Wabasha II
    Today’s growing Native population must work to influence, educate and inspire action on issues impacting American Indian/Alaska Native working families from Natives and Native allies through new and innovative tactics and strategies. A national network is a critical tactic needed to build civic and political power on behalf of improving Native communities nationally.  We will discuss how a network of over 25 Native organizations has grown from having little to no experience in engaging in collaborative work to launching two successful collective social media campaigns.  We’ll also discuss philanthropic strategies for supporting this type of movement building effort. Presenter: Chrissie Castro, Americans for Indian Opportunity; Edgar Villanueva, Marguerite Casey Foundation

  2:30pm –   3:00pm  Break

  3:00pm –   4:30pm  Cultural Engagement Activities

  6:30pm –   7:30pm  Reception
                                   Pre-Function Area

  • A gathering to celebrate Carly’s work at NAP and  give her all of our well wishes on the next path in Carly’s journey.

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

 

 8:00am – 12:00pm  Registration
                                  Registration/Coat Check

 7:30am –   9:00am  Networking Breakfast
                                  Grand Ballroom

  9:00am – 10:30am  Tribal Philanthropy and Communities: Building Stronger Connections
                                  Grand Ballroom
Moderator: Y. Elaine Rasmussen, Native Americans in Philanthropy; Panelists: Dan Martin, Cherokee Preservation Foundation; Marshall McKay, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation; and Richard Gouge, Forest County Potawatomi Executive Council

Tribes and non-tribal communities have a lot in common, including a deep commitment to the communities in which we live and work. As part of the Native tradition of reciprocity, some tribes have formalized their giving that is aligned with their community values. This panel discussion will highlight a diverse group of tribal giving institutions discussing how their sovereignty is exercised through their philanthropy, their respective giving models, constraints, challenges, and finally their positive community impact in absentia of institutional philanthropy. 

10:30am – 10:45am  Break

10:45am – 12:00pm  The Next 25 years of Giving: Community Action Plan
                                   Grand Ballroom

In the spirit of the continued learning, sharing, and deeper engagement, NAP will ignite an interactive dialogue in small group discussions organized by geographical regions to share with what you have learned throughout the conference, the connections you have made and the action you are committing to take forward into your work. Commitments will be shared to create a collective narrative for building healthy and sustainable Native Communities.

12:00pm –   1:00pm  Lunch and Annual Membership meeting
                                   Grand Ballroom

1:00pm –   2:30pm  Native American Alumni Leadership Collaboration
                                 Grand Ballroom
Moderator: David Cournoyer, Plain DEPTH Consulting. Presenters: Kelly Drummer, Tiwahe Foundation; Mary McEathron, PhD, Rainbow Research; Ken Vance-Borland, Network Weaver Consultants Network, Catherine E. Bosserman, Rainbow Research

Many participants in leadership programs have little or no structured engagement once the experience ends. In response, a group of Native American leadership program sponsors agreed to map the interests of Native alumni across their programs in order to consider possible joint strategies. This collaboration has involved Native Americans in Philanthropy and the Tiwahe, Blandin, Bush, Northwest Area and Headwaters Foundations. Within the past year, the group surveyed their Native leadership alumni; and in this session you will see network maps that visually show how leaders are currently connected around important issues and how they want to be connected in the future.

   2:30pm –  3:00pm  Closing and Blessing
                                   Grand Ballroom

   3:00pm – 6:00pm  Partner Event: Native Leadership Network Weaving**

 

Partner Events

Monday, May 4, 2015

*bushCONNECT bushCONNECT (bushCON) is a regional networking event designed to build stronger and more meaningful connections among networks of leaders in the region. bushCON is co-created in partnership with organizations across the region who help us recruit a diverse mix of people and develop interactive and engaging content that inspires, equips and connects leaders for success.

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

**”Network Weaving for Collective Native American Leadership” Because of cultural preferences that value relationship-driven, collectivist approaches, Native Americans often seek fellowship and opportunities to build relationships across organizations, geographies and other boundaries. How do we build such relationships in a more intentional way that can support and add value to our work individually and collectively? There are helpful tools and strategies in the concept of “network weaving,” which builds on Native people’s inherent relational core. This highly interactive session will share some useful strategies to weave a strong network of Native leaders – locally and beyond – by considering actual visual maps of the interests of Native leadership program alumni. This is a chance to strengthen your own project as well as connect to other leaders who face similar challenges and opportunities.This event is free. Register here!

Schedule subject to change.

Native Americans in Philanthropy and NPI are supported by:

 

blandin  Bush Foundation   Comcast   Foundant Technologies   Glenmede     WFHF_logo     The California Wellness Foundation  Lannan    Marquerite   Northwest Area   SanManuel  SMSC LOGO   WK Kellogg

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